Wandsworth House, Ebner Street, London, SW18 1BT.

Wandsworth House, Ebner Street, London, SW18 1BT

Modern

The tight site for this new Wandsworth house is fairly typical of the challenging back land sites London architects deal with. Wandsworth architect Will Caradoc-Hodgkins of London residential architect and interior designer 4D Studio liked the site so much he also built his own home on it! Having originally designed and built the main  house for previous clients on the  site that is  bound on three sides by a school and existing houses, our residential architects and interior designers were asked to radically alter the interior to suit the differing needs of the new owners, an artist and an antiques dealer. They had specific requirements to display their collection of 20th century furniture and an important art collection.

The answer to the restrictions posed by the site have led Will to develop a design with large areas of roof glazing to compensate for the lack of available light from two sides.

The central area of the house is overlooked by a dramatic balcony which leads to a large study.  The ground floor is lit to great effect from above by a vast sloping glazed roof.  Roof glazing was also used to great effect over the bathrooms. On the ground floor the original polished concrete flooring was covered by a matt poured resin surface with under floor heating to get greater light reflection for the art and furniture.

About Wandsworth

Wandsworth lies along the south bank of the River Thames in the London Borough of Wandsworth. Parts of Wandsworth, Bellevue Road and Northcote Road are villages in their own right and have a good provision of local craft shops, restaurants, artisan market stalls, butchers, bakers and bars.

Transport links are good with mainline railway stations at Clapham Junction, Wandsworth Common, Wandsworth Town, Balham, Battersea Park and Queenstown Road. There is an underground station at Balham with to the Northern line and at Tooting Bec. There are also comprehensive bus services

Wandsworth is named after the Wandle River, a tributary of the Thames. It is recorded in the Doomsday book of 1086.

Since the sixteenth century it has accommodated waves of immigration including Protestant Dutch metalworkers fleeing persecution in the 1590s.

The heart of Wandsworth, between the town centre and the river, is the site of the now closed Young & Co’s Ram Brewery, where traditional draught beer had, until recently, been produced for 425 years. It is now part of a large-scale redevelopment and regeneration proposal.