Respecting the past, embracing the present, building the future

CORNICE BY SIR EDWIN LUTYENS IN A LONDON TOWN HOUSE

As you will see from our web sites there is a strong modernist theme running through our work. This is firmly rooted in respect for the past that is based on my considerable involvement with historic buildings.

NEW MEETS OLD AT SWINDON’S HERITAGE ENGLAND HQ

On the Swindon Works, (the former British Rail Engineering Works) I was instrumental in bringing over 1 million square feet of Listed Buildings back into contemporary use. I conceived the masterplan proposals for the massive 142 acre site, obtained planning and listed building consents and was architect for the first buildings to be renovated. These include the award-winning Swindon National Office Heritage England and the archives store for the National Monuments Records Office.

PART OF OUR ORIGINAL PLANNING SUBMISSION – THE BUILDINGS SHOWN HAVE BECOME THE MUSEUM ‘STEAM’

At Chatham Maritime I dealt with 300 acres of the redundant docks that adjoined a World Heritage Centre and contained nine Scheduled Ancient Monuments and 26 Listed Buildings. Again, I prepared the approved masterplan, urban design guidelines, planning and listed building consents that brought these heritage assets back into contemporary use and was architect for the first buildings to be restored and converted.

THE BELL TOWER A SCHEDULED ANCIENT MONUMENT THAT WE RESTORED AT CHATHAM MARITIME

Over time we have worked on the adaptive re-use and restoration of buildings designed by a variety of eminent architects to include Sir Edwin Lutyens (private house), Norman Shaw (private house), Sir Giles Gilbert Scott (London’s Guildhall) and George Gilbert Scott (Amersham Hospital) plus a variety of other historic buildings.

THE RESTORED CLOCK AND CLOCK TOWER AT CHATHAM MARITIME

In dealing with historic buildings our approach is based upon principles of conservation and repair as required by the Society for the Preservation of Ancient Buildings (SPAB) rather than replacement and renewal.

A great deal of research goes into these projects for the art of conservation is dependent upon knowledge and experience of historic methods of construction, decoration and furnishing and a discerning eye for detail. This historical accuracy is fundamental to heritage projects.

WE HAVE BEEN WORKING ON WHITE LODGE FOR THE ROYAL BALLET SCHOOL FOR MANY YEARS

The fabric of a building must be understood, both as a whole and as a collection of constituent parts so that they can be treated and preserved individually.

So not only do we design fine new buildings but we also deal with the conservation of listed buildings, planning and listed building consents, urban design and regeneration in conservation areas.

Our respect for the past, embraced by the present helps us to build for the future.